Sea trout fishing in River Karup - Get started with sea trout fishing in River Karup

POOLS AND BEATS ON THE RIVER KARUP

Click on the info-points to learn more

USE THE MAP TO EXPLORE

THE RIVER KARUP

Lower River Karup

Sdr. Boulevard Bridge

The Southern Boulevard Bridge crosses the River Karup at the heart of the city of Skive. There is a nice parking here.

Lower River Karup

Trandum Bridge

The Trandum Bridge crosses River Karup close to the Church of Trandum. Nice parking.

Lower River Karup

Vridsted Bridge

The Vridsted Bridge crosses River Karup at an old crossing right outside the town of Vridsted. Nice parking. There is a shelter and a grocery store close by.

This is the ‘frontier’ between The Middle and the Lower River Karup

Hagebro

The Hagebro Bridge crosses River Karup just next to the famous Hagebro Kro inn. There is a fine parking here. As well as the inn you’ll find accommodation, hot dog/barbecue stand and a gas station.

The Middle River Karup

Sønder-Resen Bridge

The Sønder-Resen Bridge crosses River Karup midway between the town of Sønder-Resen and the town of Fårbæk. There is a fine parking here.

The Middle River Karup

Høgild Bridge

The Høgild Bridge crosses River Karup near Høgild Mølle mill. Cars can be parked along the road.

This is the ‘frontier’ between The Upper and the Middle River Karup

Karup Bro

The wild River Karup sea trout

The sea trout in River Karup is the original strain of wild trout which has been there since the last ice age.

The sea trout moved in as the ice receded and formed the River Karup valley. In other words, the sea trout’s history goes back more than 10,000 years in time.

That the sea trout still thrive there is not a given thing. Like most rivers in Denmark, and in the rest of the world, the River Karup and its many smaller tributaries have survived against all odds, and throughout most of the 20th century, the river’s stock of sea trout went from poor to terrible. As early as 1918, a hydro power plant was established in the village of Karup. This effectively barred the way for migrating sea trout to reach the spawning beds in the upper reaches of the river system.

In the 1930s, pollution from a potato starch factory destroyed a large part of the spawning grounds, from the village of Karup and 20 kilometers downstream. This and other polluting factories, like an industrial slaughterhouse and an intestinal cleaning factory, were built with complete disregard to wildlife. Though the local anglers struggled to change the tide, it took more than an angler’s patience until things finally changed: The potato starch pollution in the river, for instance, had devastating effects for all life in the river and it continued for nearly 45 years! Stocking of sea trout fry from other rivers were tried as a means to rebuild and strengthen the fish stocks. Later it became clear that this was only a short-term solution. Biologists proved that local strains by far outperform hatchery strains of trout. As a matter of fact, the success of wild trout in surviving and reproducing in the wild is much superior. As a consequence, stocking of young fish changed completely to fry from incubated eggs derived from mature wild sea trout caught within the River system by electro-fishing in the autumn. Today, the population of sea trout in the River Karup is self-sustaining and the stocking of fry has stopped. Over the years, many, many volunteers from the local angler’s associations have worked for countless hours to improve the physical conditions in the river system. In the main river as well as in the tributaries, barriers have been removed: previously, people built dams and stream crossings for roads prevented fish from migrating upstream. Where it had been straightened out, natural bends in the river were restored, its meanders given back and new spawning beds of gravel were established.

Bigger than average fish
The River Karup sea trout stay longer in the sea before returning to spawn compared to most sea trout found in other rivers. Fish tagging has shown that after having left the river as smolts, the majority of the sea trout from the River Karup leave the fjord and migrate to feeding areas as far away as the northern part of the Baltic Sea. This may be part of the explanation for the river’s truly unique type of sea trout which is known for being short, fat, and heavy. Many of the very big sea trout caught in River Karup have returned several times to spawn in the river.

Record sea trout
Denmark's biggest rod caught sea trout weighed 14.4 kilos (31½lbs) and was caught in River Karup by Kristian Plejdrup in 1939. It stood as a world record for decades. Mr. Plejdrup’s majestic fish was stuffed and it is displayed at the Trevad Trout Park Hatchery.

In 1991, a sea trout of 16.3 kilos (almost 36lbs!) measuring 108 centimeters was found dead in the River Karup. This giant fish had left the river as a smolt when it was two years old. It had spawned once prior to its final run up the river and had spent a total of 6-7 years in the sea.

FISHING RULES

In River Karup you can fish both day and night.

Fishing season: Opening day is March 1st. The season ends October 31st.

Close season: November 1st to February 28th/29th.

Minimum size for sea trout: 40 centimeters.

All catches must be reported to the River Karup Association (KÅS)

FISHING RULES

In River Karup you can fish both day and night.

Fishing season: Opening day is March 1st. The season ends October 31st.

Close season: November 1st to February 28th/29th.

Minimum size for sea trout: 40 centimeters.

All catches must be reported to the River Karup Association (KÅS)

catch and release

Rules for minimum size and close season

In Denmark, the minimum length for sea trout is 40 centimeters. Smaller fish must be released immediately and as gently as possible. The River Karup’s closing season is from the end of October until 1 March.

To keep or to release the sea trout
In the River Karup it is up to the individual angler to decide whether he will keep or release the sea trout he catches.

Many River Karup anglers voluntarily release all or most sea trout they catch. Danish law states that fish caught and killed are for personal consumption only. In other words: the sale of rod caught sea trout and salmon is illegal.

catch and release

Rules for minimum size and close season

In Denmark, the minimum length for sea trout is 40 centimeters. Smaller fish must be released immediately and as gently as possible. The River Karup’s closing season is from the end of October until 1 March.

To keep or to release the sea trout
In the River Karup it is up to the individual angler to decide whether he will keep or release the sea trout he catches.

Many River Karup anglers voluntarily release all or most sea trout they catch. Danish law states that fish caught and killed are for personal consumption only. In other words: the sale of rod caught sea trout and salmon is illegal.

HOW TO GET STARTED

FISHING LICENSE

Angler’s associations sell fishing licenses, both day and week tickets. See below a list with all the angler’s associations. Remember to buy the national fishing license.

HOW TO GET STARTED

FISHING LICENSE

Angler’s associations sell fishing licenses, both day and week tickets. See below a list with all the angler’s associations. Remember to buy the national fishing license.

LEARN MORE ABOUT GOOD STYLE AT THE RIVER

There is a long tradition of good behavior that governs the gentle art of sea trout angling in the River Karup.

These unwritten do’s and don’ts are as important as the more recent enforced regulations as they ensure the best fishing conditions for all anglers on the river.

Recommendations and generally accepted principles of common courtesy and respect:

 

  • Use proper equipment: Be prepared to fight big and strong fish. The average size sea trout weighs over 3 kilos (7lb). Remember that ‘average’ means that some are much bigger! In order to be able to play the fish hard and fast (if you want to release it) the line diameter should not be less than 0.35-0.40 mm.
  • Ask if in doubt: Talking to local anglers and observing their behavior on the riverbank will help you in determining local angling etiquette. When in doubt, let courtesy be your guide.
  • Advice and help: Ask fellow anglers if you need advice or help. Most anglers are eager to give good advice. Some of the angler’s associations have members who will volunteer to help you get started.
  • No stress: Part of the joy of fishing is to get away from everyday routines and the hustle and bustle of daily life. Accept that others arrived before you on your chosen stretch of river, and, as a general rule, always start behind those who are already fishing the pool.
  • Keep your distance: In case you have no other option than to start your fishing in front of a fellow angler, make sure to do so with a minimum of 100 meters between the two of you.
  • Ask: It is good manners to ask permission before you start fishing downstream of a fellow angler.
  • Keep on the move: Do not ‘freeze’ when fishing one of the recognized taking spots in the river. Take 3-5 paces downstream when each cast has been fished out in order to constantly move along the river.
  • A stealthy approach: Big sea trout are easily spooked. Move along the river as silently as possible. Preferably, keep a little distance from the river. This applies to when you fish and also on your way to and from fishing.
  • Visit the river in daylight: Before going fishing at night, it is recommended to walk the beat in daylight. Notice the places that might be challenging in the darkness.
  • Be careful when using light during night fishing: Night fishing for sea trout is an effective method, but requires ‘light discipline’. Don’t turn on your torch near to the river as this may spook the fish – and annoy fellow anglers.
  • Reel in when an angler is playing a fish: As a matter of courtesy, quickly reel in so that lines don’t get tangled. You may offer assistance to the angler in landing the fish if you feel confident to do so. Otherwise, it is always appreciated if you take a quick photo of the fish as it is landed or released.
  • Do not prolong the ‘photo session’: If the fish is to be released, give it the best chances to survive after having been caught by releasing it quickly. Don’t lift the fish clear of the water.
  • Positive thinking: Contribute to the positive and respectful atmosphere at the river.

Respect the river and the land: Do not leave rubbish or start fires.

General rules:

  • Mandatory catch reporting: All caught fish must be reported – including fish that are being released.
  • Angling season: In the River Karup, the angling season starts March 1st and ends October 31st.
  • Minimum size: In Denmark, the minimum length for sea trout is 40 centimeters. Smaller fish must be released immediately and as gently as possible.

Supplementary rules:

The local angling association may have supplementary rules.

Info-Point by the river

To make it easier for anglers to get started, a number of info-points are set up. Use the info-points as the starting point or meeting place on your angling trips. Each info-point has information about the area and the fishing there.

You can find info-points on the stretch from the town of Fårbæk downstream to Hagebro Bridge. They are all to be found on the southern side of the River Karup.

 

 

Riverfisher blog

On the Riverfisher blog you can read reports about fishing in River Karup written by experienced local anglers.

Jochen Gehrke, Germany


“I very well remember my first trip to the River Karup a couple of years ago. I fished there for a weekend in September and saw more sea trout during those two days than I had seen in the previous three years fishing for sea trout along the coasts”.

Information on
fishing guides

It can be a challenge to fish the River Karup for the first time. Sea trout are difficult and without local knowledge where do you go and what are the best tactics right now?

Happily, voluntary anglers from some of the angler’s associations offer to help you getting started on the association’s waters.

Please contact the local associations to learn more.

Professional guiding

In addition to the voluntary network of anglers, Riverfisher and some of the angler’s associations offer guidance for individuals or groups up to 4 people.

The following angler’s associations offer the service of educated guides:

  • Herning Ikast Angler’s Association.
  • Aulum-Haderup Angler’s Association.
  • Sønder Resen Angler’s Consortium.
     

When hiring a guide through Riverfisher, you are assured that the guide has:

  • Local experience.
  • Knowledge of choosing the right spot and being there at the right moment.
  • Expertise in choosing the right gear.
  • Focus on getting a good experience when going fishing.


What you get:

  • Help in choosing between day and night fishing.
  • There’s no guarantee of catching fish during a guided tour. But you will be sure to acquire skills that will help you on future trips to the river.
  • The professional guides will do their utmost for you to enjoy the fishing trip.

WEED CUTTING IN
RIVER KARUP

Two weed cutting operations are performed each season on the River Karup and its tributaries. This is necessary to help manage water flow and height as well as keeping the rivers open to anglers.

Weed cutting takes place during the fishing season on dates and at frequencies fixed by the angler’s associations, the land owners, and the local municipalities. Weed cutting does not, generally, make fishing impossible but may adversely affect the fishing on a temporary basis because of the large quantities of cut weed floating down the river.

Fortunately, several collecting points have been established along the river. This way, the fishing in the river is only affected a few days following the cutting of the weed.

Above water, grazing cows play a vital role in keeping the vegetation cut down. Without this grazing, the river would be much more difficult to fish. The width of the river also tends to decrease without the help of these grazers.

WEED CUTTING IN
RIVER KARUP

Two weed cutting operations are performed each season on the River Karup and its tributaries. This is necessary to help manage water flow and height as well as keeping the rivers open to anglers.

Weed cutting takes place during the fishing season on dates and at frequencies fixed by the angler’s associations, the land owners, and the local municipalities. Weed cutting does not, generally, make fishing impossible but may adversely affect the fishing on a temporary basis because of the large quantities of cut weed floating down the river.

Fortunately, several collecting points have been established along the river. This way, the fishing in the river is only affected a few days following the cutting of the weed.

Above water, grazing cows play a vital role in keeping the vegetation cut down. Without this grazing, the river would be much more difficult to fish. The width of the river also tends to decrease without the help of these grazers.

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