Fishing zones River Skjern - Map of pools, beats and zones in River Skjern

Pools and beats on the River Skjern

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the River Skjern

River Skjern is long and there is a big difference between the top and bottom of the river.

River Skjern zone 2

River Skjern grows bigger after the junction with River Karstoft. It is from 6 up to 12 meters wide. The landscape is still hilly and the small forests are replaced by open fields. The river wriggle like an eel, and the flow is quick. Short fly rods, 11-13 feet, fit well here.

River Skjern is long and there is a big difference between the top and bottom of the river.

River Skjern zone 1

This is the upper part of River Skjern. The stretch begins at Arnborg at a place called “The Confusion”. It ends where River Karstoft joins the River Skjern – between Skarrild and Sdr. Felding. The river meanders through a landscape alternating between moorland and forest. The river is quite narrow, no more than 4-8 meters wide. The current is fast and solid soil structures (hardpan) on the bottom create varied currents. Short fly rods and short shooting heads fit perfectly here. The fishing pressure is moderate leaving plenty of room for exploring large areas. Even with stormy weather from the west, it is possible to find places with shelter up here thanks to the hilly landscape and the winding path of the river.

River Skjern is long and there is a big difference between the top and bottom of the river.

River Skjern zone 3

Just before the town of Borris, River Vorgod, a major tributary, meets River Skjern. Downstream of the junction, the river grows to a width of 10-20 meters. The stretch upstream from the road bridge at Borriskrog contains some of the deepest parts of the entire river. Here heavy sink fly lines are required during the spring fishing. Downstream the bridge, the landscape changes character. The hilly landscape is replaced by a more flat and open one. Here there is little shelter when the west wind blows. The windy conditions and the size of the river call for fly rods from 12 to 14 feet in length.

River Skjern is long and there is a big difference between the top and bottom of the river.

River Skjern zone 4

Three kilometers downstream of Albæk Bridge, River Omme meets River Skjern. The additional water from this major tributary makes River Skjern grow to a width of 20-30 meters. Here, even a 14-foot long fly rod suddenly looks small. Many salmon are caught in this lower part of the river, and the stretch attracts many anglers. On the map above you can see the fishing spots mentioned in the descriptions of the individual zones. Use the River Skjern map to get an overview of all the pools and fishing spots in River Skjern.

Portrait of River Skjern from the upper to the lower stretches

River Skjern is long and there is a big difference between the top and bottom of the river. It is almost like two different rivers. For convenience, we have divided the river into four parts: one upper part, two middle beats and finally the lower part. We call them zones 1, 2, 3 and 4.

Here comes a brief description of the four zones.


River Skjern zone 1

This is the upper part of River Skjern. The stretch begins at Arnborg at a place called “The Confusion”. It ends where River Karstoft joins the River Skjern – between Skarrild and Sdr. Felding. The river meanders through a landscape alternating between moorland and forest. The river is quite narrow, no more than 4-8 meters wide. The current is fast and solid soil structures (hardpan) on the bottom create varied currents. Short fly rods and short shooting heads fit perfectly here. The fishing pressure is moderate leaving plenty of room for exploring large areas. Even with stormy weather from the west, it is possible to find places with shelter up here thanks to the hilly landscape and the winding path of the river.
 

River Skjern zone 2

River Skjern grows bigger after the junction with River Karstoft. It is from 6 up to 12 meters wide. The landscape is still hilly and the small forests are replaced by open fields. The river wriggle like an eel, and the flow is quick. Short fly rods, 11-13 feet, fit well here.


River Skjern zone 3

Just before the town of Borris, River Vorgod, a major tributary, meets River Skjern. Downstream of the junction, the river grows to a width of 10-20 meters. The stretch upstream from the road bridge at Borriskrog contains some of the deepest parts of the entire river. Here heavy sink fly lines are required during the spring fishing. Downstream the bridge, the landscape changes character. The hilly landscape is replaced by a more flat and open one. Here there is little shelter when the west wind blows. The windy conditions and the size of the river call for fly rods from 12 to 14 feet in length.


River Skjern zone 4

Three kilometers downstream of Albæk Bridge, River Omme meets River Skjern. The additional water from this major tributary makes River Skjern grow to a width of 20-30 meters. Here, even a 14-foot long fly rod suddenly looks small. Many salmon are caught in this lower part of the river, and the stretch attracts many anglers. On the map above you can see the fishing spots mentioned in the descriptions of the individual zones. Use the River Skjern map to get an overview of all the pools and fishing spots in River Skjern.

Riverfisher map and poster of the River Skjern

In order for visiting anglers to have the best possible experience.

Riverfisher has published the following folders and posters:

A folder with a map showing the River Skjern. All the beats and the specific pool names are marked on the map. The folder fits into a pocket.

A poster showing the River Skjern, to hang on the wall reminding you of the good time spend fishing the river.

The folder costs 20 Danish crowns DKK (£2.50).
The poster costs 100 Danish crowns DKK (£12).

Riverfisher map and poster of the River Skjern

In order for visiting anglers to have the best possible experience.

Riverfisher has published the following folders and posters:

A folder with a map showing the River Skjern. All the beats and the specific pool names are marked on the map. The folder fits into a pocket.

A poster showing the River Skjern, to hang on the wall reminding you of the good time spend fishing the river.

The folder costs 20 Danish crowns DKK (£2.50).
The poster costs 100 Danish crowns DKK (£12).

River Skjern

With its 90 kilometers, the River Skjern is not the longest river in Denmark but it has the highest discharge as it drains a very large area.

More than 11 % of Jutland is drained by the main river and its many tributaries. The river has its source at a locality called Tinnet in the same area where the country’s longest river, the River Gudenå (160 kilometers), has its source. The range of flows in the River Skjern is considerable, from an average of 15 cubic meters per second in summer to 22 cubic meters per second during the winter months. Each river has its own variety or race of salmon and the River Skjern salmon is one of the few original lowland salmon races to have survived since the last ice age more than 10,000 years ago. The river is a typical Danish lowland river and rises at 223 feet (68 m). This isn’t much compared to Norwegian or Scottish rivers but it is perfectly suited to its native stock of wild salmon. The River Skjern is renowned for the size of its salmon. Some specimens exceed the 25 kilos (55lb) mark. The average size in 2017 was 6 kilos (13lbs) which is higher than in most European salmon rivers. Catching one of the huge salmon in this river is at the top of many anglers’ wish lists, it is the ultimate challenge.

The first angling tourists came to Denmark to fish in the River Skjern in the years before World War II. Unfortunately, in the 20th century, the river and its salmon suffered from pollution, fish farms and netting in the sea. A final blow was the straightening out of the lower 26 kilometers of the river in the 1960s where its meandering nature, so essential to juvenile fish, was made into a life less canal some 19 kilometers in length. In the following years, the river’s stock of salmon declined significantly. In the mid-1980s, biologists predicted that extinction of the salmon was almost inevitable. Some years, the annual catches from the river were as low as 5 salmon. Then, in 1987, 25 years after the fatal canalization, the Danish Government decided to restore the River Skjern. Based on aerial photos, the old path of the river was reinstated. Fish farms were closed, obstacles removed and new spawning beds of gravel created.  The hatchery at The Danish Centre for Wild Salmon played a vital role in the rivers wild fish rebuilding program. By rearing juveniles for release into the river to ensure the survival of the existing population, the wild salmon stock recovered. Consider joining one of the angling associations along the river and take an active part in the association’s work to enhance the fish stocks in the river. The angling associations offer both membership and the sale of day and week tickets for the River Skjern and its tributaries

River Skjern

With its 90 kilometers, the River Skjern is not the longest river in Denmark but it has the highest discharge as it drains a very large area.

More than 11 % of Jutland is drained by the main river and its many tributaries. The river has its source at a locality called Tinnet in the same area where the country’s longest river, the River Gudenå (160 kilometers), has its source. The range of flows in the River Skjern is considerable, from an average of 15 cubic meters per second in summer to 22 cubic meters per second during the winter months. Each river has its own variety or race of salmon and the River Skjern salmon is one of the few original lowland salmon races to have survived since the last ice age more than 10,000 years ago. The river is a typical Danish lowland river and rises at 223 feet (68 m). This isn’t much compared to Norwegian or Scottish rivers but it is perfectly suited to its native stock of wild salmon. The River Skjern is renowned for the size of its salmon. Some specimens exceed the 25 kilos (55lb) mark. The average size in 2017 was 6 kilos (13lbs) which is higher than in most European salmon rivers. Catching one of the huge salmon in this river is at the top of many anglers’ wish lists, it is the ultimate challenge.

The first angling tourists came to Denmark to fish in the River Skjern in the years before World War II. Unfortunately, in the 20th century, the river and its salmon suffered from pollution, fish farms and netting in the sea. A final blow was the straightening out of the lower 26 kilometers of the river in the 1960s where its meandering nature, so essential to juvenile fish, was made into a life less canal some 19 kilometers in length. In the following years, the river’s stock of salmon declined significantly. In the mid-1980s, biologists predicted that extinction of the salmon was almost inevitable. Some years, the annual catches from the river were as low as 5 salmon. Then, in 1987, 25 years after the fatal canalization, the Danish Government decided to restore the River Skjern. Based on aerial photos, the old path of the river was reinstated. Fish farms were closed, obstacles removed and new spawning beds of gravel created.  The hatchery at The Danish Centre for Wild Salmon played a vital role in the rivers wild fish rebuilding program. By rearing juveniles for release into the river to ensure the survival of the existing population, the wild salmon stock recovered. Consider joining one of the angling associations along the river and take an active part in the association’s work to enhance the fish stocks in the river. The angling associations offer both membership and the sale of day and week tickets for the River Skjern and its tributaries

River Skjern angling history

The first rod-caught salmon from River Skjern was landed back in the late 1800s.

Back then, in 1897, one of the river’s pioneers and most famous anglers, Mister Hans Bache, captured his first salmon in River Skjern.

Mister Bache was a local shoemaker and became an angling legend as he caught more than 200 salmon in the river from 1897 to 1954.
On April 15th 1954, wine merchant D.C. Dinesen caught Denmark’s largest salmon in the river. It weighed 26.5 kilos (58lb) and measured 136 centimeters. Mister Dinesen caught the record salmon on a spinner. Two days later, Hans Bache caught what would be his last salmon from the river – his salmon number 205.

The interest for salmon angling dropped during the 1960’s and 1970’s as the number of salmon in the river dwindled.

A few salmon-anglers persisted, though. When one of them after weeks, months and sometimes years of angling was finally lucky enough to land one, the event hit the newspaper’s headlines.

In the 1990s, due to a successful largescale restoration project in the river, anglers returned with renewed hope as more and more salmon returned to the river to spawn.

In 2008, no more than 5 years after the river had been given its former bends and meanders back, a total of 878 salmon were caught in River Skjern.

Over the next decade this number would almost double: in 2018, close to 1,750 salmon were caught on rod in the river.

The big salmon study

A new research project worth DKK 21 million (2.8 million euro) will examine the salmon’s living conditions in River Skjern. The Danish salmon stocks have evolved over the last 25 years from being on the brink of extinction to a level where anglers along the Danish rivers again can catch salmon. The research project will determine if there exist bottlenecks in nature – predatory birds, spawning conditions, barriers in the rivers, etcetera – that can be changed to the benefit of the stocks of salmon.

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Millions to a new salmon research program


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